Job Searching during the Holidays

Seeking a new job for the Holidays

ivylargemediumJob searching during the holidays can add an additional level of stress and to an already stressful time of year. But there is an upside to interviewing during the holiday season.

Here’s why Job hunting during the holidays, is such a brilliant idea!!

With over 20% of job seekers opting out of job searching due to the holidays a fifth of your competition just left the market,  and an even larger percentage fail to update their resumes and profiles on the job search engines.  So now is the time to capitalize on that advantage.

How to beat the Holiday Job Search blues:

  • Create complete job applications. Resist the urge to send a blind resume, employers seeking to hire are more likely to view resumes in an online format that they are accustomed to, the rest is for the delete button.
  • Please follow the job application instructions.  To ignore directions tells the manager that you do not/will not follow directions – and you wonder why they have not called on your resume!
  • If you have created a job application more than three months ago, please go back in and update, better yet create a new resume or profile, you may have fallen to Resume 1005 – nobody reads that many.
  • Most job boards allow you to add up to three resumes/profiles. Every now and again, update to rise to the top.
  • Change or remove your objective or summary so your info looks new.
  • Take a good attitude and lots of business cards to holiday functions. Hint: do not hand out your resume at holiday functions, offer to email it the next day.
  • Still no hits or interviews after three weeks – thrash the whole thing. Create a new resume or profile.  Do it yourself or invest in your career, have a professional resume writer design it for you
  • Some of the best salary offers are made during this upbeat time of year – so hang in there!!

Visit us often at  FranklinPatersonResumes for resumes and cover letters that will get you noticed for the right reasons.

http://franklinpaterson.com

Thanks and Happy Holidays!!  

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Getting Past Resume Gate Keepers

Just a reminder that we are in the biggest hiring period of the year, especially for new grads! Managers are beginning to list more jobs and the interviewing pace has picked up. But, as mentioned in our last update, there are more candidates are on the market – so the jobs are filled quickly, and the competition is stiffer.

 

New Job Alert
This no time for the faint hearted, budgets have been approved and the jobs that are available are part of a company’s long term strategy, so there will be competition. You also need to get by a natural adversary, the resume gatekeeper, whose sole purpose it appears is to decide whether your resume will be seen by the hiring manager.

A few tips to get past the resume gate keepers:

1. Do not address a resume to: “To whom it may concern”, the answer to that intro is – nobody. Use Dear Hiring Manager, Dear Recruiter or the person’s name if available, or a simple Hello, I am seeking a………. position (add the remainder of your cover letter here).

2. If you are going to be a Confidential Jobseeker please indicate that you are actively seeking a new position, somewhere prominent in your application. Confidential resumes are generally less likely to be read, the word confidential can be off-putting to a manager, so you must make the extra effort to invite them to read your resume.

3. When posting your resume on the job boards, follow the job application directions when applying for a position, before calling a recruiter. You cannot charm a busy recruiter, no matter how great your phone skills. A recruiter will do a better job at qualifying you if the resume is at hand and the is information is in a format they can use.

What does all this mean – create fewer online applications and do them properly, follow-up a day or two later with a mid-afternoon phone call.
This could just be your year!!!!

Franklin Paterson Resumes – October 21, 2019

 

 

 

How to Turn Down a Job Interview

Great Company, Terrible Job,
How to Turn Down a Job Interview
  
Still Looking for that perfect job?Many candidates complain that they are being invited to interviews for jobs, that appear to have nothing to do with their current skills, or job interest.
What to do – should you turn down the interview, and if so, how do you turn down this interview, but still keep yourself active with the company or referral agency. Should you attend every interview you are invited to?

  • Before you turn down the interview ask for a bit of time to review your schedule or research the company. Ask the interview scheduler for the URL of the company career site; visit their site to learn more about the position.
  • Find out if the company is hiring for other positions you might be interested in or qualified for.
  • Often if you do not accept an interview when you are first called, you may have difficulty getting the HR person or the interview scheduler back on the phone to schedule your interview or to turn down the interview.
  • Send an email or leave a cordial message within a few hours, indicating an interest in taking the interview, learning more or your regret in turning it down. Highlight your interest in hearing about other positions at the company. If there is another job or location that you may have an interest say so, and include a snippet about your ideal job.
  • Don’t wing it, have a prepared turned down comment of two or three lines. Try to end with a comment such as, thank you for you time and consideration of my resume, I plan to mention your opening to qualified friends and associates.

    Turning down a job offer is one thing, tuning down an interview is quite another!

    Visit: Learn more: Franklin Paterson Resumes

Mediocrity is cunning: it can disguise itself as achievement.

Being second rate is not simply the curse of being an over-promoted underachiever – it’s the default state of the universe

slipperyroadlarge80 In the early years of the last century, Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset proposed a solution to society’s ills that still strikes me as ingenious, in a deranged way. He argued that all public sector workers from the top down (though, come to think of it, why not everyone else, too?) should be demoted to the level beneath their current job.

His reasoning foreshadowed the Peter Principle: in hierarchies, people “rise to their level of incompetence”. Do your job well, and you’re rewarded with promotion, until you reach a job you’re less good at, where you remain.

In a recent book, The Hard Thing About Hard Things, the tech investor Ben Horowitz adds a twist: “The Law of Crappy People”. As soon as someone on a given rung at a company gets as good as the worst person the next rung up, he or she may expect a promotion.

Yet, if it’s granted, the firm’s talent levels will gradually slide downhill. No one person need be peculiarly crappy for this to occur; bureaucracies just tend to be crappier than the sum of their parts.

Yet it’s wrong to think of these pitfalls as restricted to organizations. There’s a case to be made that the gravitational pull of the mediocre affects all life – as John Stuart Mill put it, that “the general tendency of things throughout the world is to render mediocrity the ascendant power among mankind”.

True, it’s most obvious in the workplace (hence the observation that “a meeting moves at the pace of the slowest mind in the room”), but the broader point is that in any domain – work, love, friendship, health – crappy solutions crowd out good ones time after time, so long as they’re not so bad as to destroy the system.

People and organizations hit plateau not because they couldn’t do better, but because a plateau is a tolerable, even comfortable place. Even evolution – life itself! – is all about mediocrity. “Survival of the fittest” isn’t a progression towards greatness; it just means the survival of the sufficiently non-terrible.

And mediocrity is cunning: it can disguise itself as achievement. The cliché of a “mediocre” worker is a Dilbert-esque manager with little to do. But as Greg McKeown notes, in his book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit Of Less the busyness of the go-getter can lead to mediocrity, too.

Throw yourself at every opportunity and you’ll end up doing unimportant stuff – and badly. You can’t fight this with motivational tricks or cheesy mission statements: you need a discipline, a rule you apply daily, to counter the pull of the sub-par.

For a company, that might mean stricter, more objective promotion policies. For the over-busy person, there’s McKeown’s “90% Rule” – when considering an option, ask: does it score at least 9/10 on some relevant criterion? If not, say no. (Ideally, that criterion is: “Is this fulfilling?”, but the rule still works if it’s “Does this pay the bills?”)

Mediocrity is no mere character flaw, but a deep tendency of the universe, to be ceaselessly fought, with no hope of final victory. Sorry, I don’t make the rules.

Read entire article by: Oliver Burkeman | Beware the gravitational pull of mediocrity | The Guardian

Happy New Year

  WISHING YOU A HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

To Our Friends and Customers,

We wish you a new year full of happiness and good fortune.

Last year was an expansion year for us, full of interesting lessons, new business lines and partnerships.

We look forward to 2019 and the success it will bring, and we wish the same to our business partners, friends and customers as well.

May endless joy and happiness be with you throughout the New Year…

From, all of us at FPSelectJobs.com
For some of the best jobs anywhere!!!